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cannons - how it worked? some answers...

Johnny Exodice
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Published on 31 Dec 2019 / In Film and Animation
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Johnny Exodice
Johnny Exodice 3 months ago

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Canons The Words are TOO Similar, and why call a CAMERA the word of Canon??? Were these also some type of Long Range Spy Scopes into the Skies or a way to see mega Distance on a FLAT EARTH Reality??? The Brown Gloves of the Trench Coats...

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Johnny Exodice
Johnny Exodice 3 months ago

canon (redirected from Canons)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Canons: Canons of Construction
canon
law, rule, or code; basis for judgment; criterion
Not to be confused with:
cannon – weapon for firing projectiles
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree
ca·ñon (kăn′yən)
n. Archaic
Variant of canyon.
can·on 1 (kăn′ən)
n.
1. An ecclesiastical law or code of laws established by a church council.
2. A secular law, rule, or code of law.
3.
a. An established principle: the canons of polite society.
b. A basis for judgment; a standard or criterion.
4. The books of the Bible officially accepted as Holy Scripture.
5.
a. A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field: "the durable canon of American short fiction" (William Styron).
b. The works of a writer that have been accepted as authentic: the entire Shakespeare canon.
c. Material considered to be officially part of a fictional universe or considered to fit within the history established by a fictional universe: "The Harry Potter series was one of the first pieces of media to inspire widespread fan fiction writing, probably because its popularity coincided with the early days of the Internet, but its creator has also shown herself more than willing to keep updating the canon" (Emma Cueto).
6. Canon The part of the Mass beginning after the Preface and Sanctus and ending just before the Lord's Prayer.
7. The calendar of saints accepted by the Roman Catholic Church.
8. Music A composition or passage in which a melody is imitated by one or more voices at fixed intervals of pitch and time.
[Middle English canoun, from Old English canon and from Old French, both from Latin canōn, rule, from Greek kanōn, measuring rod, rule, of Semitic origin; see qnw in Semitic roots.]
can·on 2 (kăn′ən)
n.
1. A member of a chapter of priests serving in a cathedral or collegiate church.
2. A member of certain religious communities living under a common rule and bound by vows.
[Middle English canoun, from Norman French canun, from Late Latin canōnicus, one living under a rule, from Latin canōn, rule; see canon1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
canon (ˈkænən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a Church decree enacted to regulate morals or religious practices
2. (often plural) a general rule or standard, as of judgment, morals, etc
3. (often plural) a principle or accepted criterion applied in a branch of learning or art
4. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the complete list of the canonized saints
5. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the prayer in the Mass in which the Host is consecrated
6. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a list of writings, esp sacred writings, officially recognized as genuine
7. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a list of writings, esp sacred writings, officially recognized as genuine
8. (Classical Music) a piece of music in which an extended melody in one part is imitated successively in one or more other parts. See also round31, catch33
9. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a list of the works of an author that are accepted as authentic
10. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (formerly) a size of printer's type equal to 48 point
[Old English, from Latin, from Greek kanōn rule, rod for measuring, standard; related to kanna reed, cane1]
canon (ˈkænən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) one of several priests on the permanent staff of a cathedral, who are responsible for organizing services, maintaining the fabric, etc
2. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church Also called: canon regular a member of either of two religious orders, the Augustinian or Premonstratensian Canons, living communally as monks but performing clerical duties
[C13: from Anglo-French canunie, from Late Latin canonicus one living under a rule, from canon1]
canonical, canonic adj
cañon (ˈkænjən)
n
(Physical Geography) a variant spelling of canyon
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

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Johnny Exodice
Johnny Exodice 3 months ago

Just by studying our Celestial Sphere 2 Sided FLAT EARTHS these Canons are NOT WEAPONS as told, but so much METAL for such a Device it was made to live on after the Great Nuclear Hydrogen War Cover Up of 1853 T.L. Jeppo Jinx~

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